'Come From Away'

“Come From Away” is still on the calendar for Aug. 11-23, but Hennepin Theatre Trust is “working with show producers to evaluate the timing and feasibility of the Minneapolis engagement.”

Photo by Matthew Murphy

“Come From Away” is still on the calendar for Aug. 11-23, but Hennepin Theatre Trust is “working with show producers to evaluate the timing and feasibility of the Minneapolis engagement.”

Hennepin Theatre Trust on Tuesday announced sweeping changes to its current and upcoming Broadway on Hennepin seasons.

In April, HTT postponed the highly anticipated three-week run of Disney’s “Frozen,” which would have been happening now. It is working with show producers to confrm dates for fall 2021. (On Broadway, “Frozen” has closed permanently, “iced by COVID-19.”)

“Anastasia” was postponed in March – its original dates were March 24-29 – and is still on the calendar for December 1-6 of this year.

As of Tuesday, “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical,” previously scheduled for July 14-19, has been canceled. “Come From Away” is still on the calendar for Aug. 11-23, but HTT is “working with show producers to evaluate the timing and feasibility of the Minneapolis engagement.”

The return of “Hamilton,” originally set for Oct. 6-Nov. 22, has been moved to July 28-Aug. 29, 2021. It’s the only show in HTT’s 2020-21 season that has been firmly rescheduled, if “firmly” is a word we can actually use, and who knows?

“To Kill a Mockingbird,” originally Dec. 15-20, will be rescheduled. “Tootsie,” originally July 28-Aug. 1, 2021, will move out of the way for “Hamilton,” with new dates TBD.

We’re just glad we saw “My Fair Lady” (loverly!) before “canceled,” “postponed” and “rescheduled” entered our everyday vocabulary.

These are big touring productions. We’ve all seen the trucks parked near the Orpheum when shows are on. HTT’s release about the rearrangement of the season included this reminder: “Presenting touring Broadway requires months of preparation and much of the production process, such as casting, building sets and costumes and rehearsing, cannot begin until it is safe to work.”

We buy a ticket, we go to a show, we take it in, we leave. But an unimaginable amount of planning, preparation and work takes place before the house lights dim and the curtain rises. Cancelations and postponements are rough in the best of times, and these are the worst of times.

Pamela Espeland writes the Artscape column for MinnPost.

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